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Rice Planting By Fernando Amorsolo Descriptive Essay

Afternoon meal of the rice workers, 1951, oil on canvas. Won first prize at the New York World's Fair.

Mango pickers, oil on Canvas, 1936.

Fruit Gatherer, oil on board, 1950. A specimen of Amorsolo's conception of an ideal Filipina beauty.

The Palay Maiden

El Ciego (The Blind Man), oil on panel, 1929. This work commissioned by a naval intelligence officer who helped in the liberation of Manila during World War II.

A Basket of Mangoes, oil on canvas, 1949 by Fernando Amorsolo.

The making of the Philippine Flag

Tinikling in barrio, 1951, Oil on canvas.

Washing scene, 1953

Planting rice

Princess Urduja

Market scene by Fernando Amorsolo.

A young girl with jar by Fernando Amorsolo, 1952.

Under the arbor, oil on Board, 1928.

Lavandera, oil on Board, 1928.

An Amorsolo painting, 1940.

Portrait of an old lady, Oil on canvas laid down on board, 1941.

An Amorsolo painting, 1952.

Water carrier, oil on Board, 1937.

Returning fisherman, oil on Board, 1943.

Fernando Amorsolo self portrait (No higher resolution).

Reading a Letter, 1933, India ink with pencil on heavy paper. Originally acquired by Whipple Hall and Ethel Crellin. Whipple Hall was American businessman who settled in Manila in 1909 and then returned to America in 1936. One of the folders containing the drawings bears a notation by Ethel Crellin dated 1933.

Days End, Washing the Carabao, 1928, oil on Board. At the end of the work day, the farmers take the carabao to the water for washing and feeding.

Writing a Letter, 1933, india ink with pencil on illustration board. Originally acquired by Whipple Hall and Ethel Crellin. Whipple Hall was American businessman who settled in Manila in 1909 and then returned to America in 1936. One of the folders containing the drawings bears a notation by Ethel Crellin dated 1933.

An Amorsolo painting, 1960.

Along mountain trail.

Old Spanish church, oil on canvas, 1957.

Man with a cockerel, oil on board, 1938.

Landscape, oil on canvas, 1951.

Baguio, 1941, oil on board.

Reference:
Photo and text: Wikipedia commons and other open sources

Saturday Volcano Art: Fernando Amorsolo, ‘Planting Rice with Mayon Volcano’ (1949) 9 May 2009

Posted by admin in Mayon, Philippines, Saturday volcano art, volcano art, volcano culture.
Tags: Fernando Amorsolo, Mayon, Philippines, Saturday volcano art
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The painter Fernando Amorsolo (1892-1972) was a dominant figure in the visual arts of the Philippines during the decades before the Second World War and into the post-war period. His oeuvre is characterized by scenes of the Filipino countryside, harmoniously composed and richly coloured, saturated with bright sunlight and populated by beautiful, happy people: it is an art of beauty, contentment, peace and plenty – which perhaps explains its enduring popularity in the Philippines to this day.

Amorsolo was committed to two fundamental ideas in his art: first, a classical notion of idealism, in which artistic truth was found through harmony, balance and beauty, and second a conservative concept of Filipino national character as rooted in rural communities and the cycles of village life. The two come together in pastoral scenes such as ‘Planting Rice with Mayon Volcano’, painted in 1949. Here, happy Filipino villagers in their bright clothes and straw hats work together amid a green and sunlit landscape of plenty. Behind them, releasing a peaceful plume of steam, rises the beautifully symmetrical cone of Mayon stratovolcano. It is the ash erupted by the volcano over its highly-active history that has made the surrounding landscape fertile, and the tranquil cone appears here to be a beneficial spirit of the earth standing guardian over the villagers and their crops. Mayon’s eruptions can be very destructive (as in the violent eruption of 1947, not long before this picture was painted, when pyroclastic flows and lahars brought widespread destruction and fatalities) but here the relationship between the volcano and the surrounding landscape is depicted as a positive, fruitful and harmonious one. Mayon is a celebrated symbol of the Philippines, and its presence in Amorsolo’s painting emphasizes his wish to represent the spirit of the nation on canvas.

‘Planting Rice with Mayon Volcano’ is in the collection of the Metropolitan Museum of Manila.

For all ‘Saturday volcano art’ articles: Saturday volcano art « The Volcanism Blog.

Further reading

Fernando C. Amorsolo Art Foundation
Fernando Amorsolo works at Frazer Fine Arts
The National Artists of the Philippines: Fernando C. Amorsolo
Alice G. Guillermo, Image to Meaning: Essays on Philippine Art (Manila: Ateneo de Manila University Press, 2001)
Paul A. Rodell, Culture and Customs of the Philippines (Westport, CT: Greenwood Press, 2002)